Scribbles
By Bob Curtis, Local Secretary

June 2014

The Latin name for June is Junius. Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 BC to AD 18) offers multiple etymologies for the name in the Fasti, a poem about the Roman calendar. The first is that the month is named after the Roman Goddess, Juno, the goddess of marriage and the wife of the supreme deity Jupiter; the second is that the name comes from the Latin word iuniores, meaning "younger ones", as opposed to maiores ("elders") for which the preceding month May (Maius) may be named. (Fasti VI.88).

Northern New Jersey Mensa's executive committee met on Sunday, May 11th. We discussed the fact that the coffee tasting which was originally scheduled for April 6th and then rescheduled to May 11th had to be cancelled because only four people had made reservations. Donna Funk, a member of NNJM and the proprietor of Moon Doggie Coffee Roasters in Maywood, advised me that for the tasting to be successful she needed between ten and sixteen people present. In addition to being a fun event, this was also to be a fundraiser for our scholarship fund from which we make the Wendy Sailer Scholarship award. We also discussed the Lecture Series event which took place on December 7th, and how helpful it would be if our own newsletter, IMprint, could be published about a week earlier each month. We also agreed to combine this year's July and August issues into one issue to come out in the middle of July. (Our editor will be on a trip to Europe.)

At the meeting we began planning our annual picnic at Van Saun Park. We are looking toward having this picnic on August 10th or August 17th. The picnic has been very well attended for the last few years. We hope that a large number of members and their friends participate this year.

To report on our national organization, American Mensa Limited, the email exchanged among Local Secretaries revolves primarily about various ways of publishing the local group newsletters and concerns about the high American Mensa dues and how most of this dues money is spent.

Mensa continues to celebrate bright young new members. An 11-year-old boy in the UK has achieved the highest possible score of 162 on a Mensa IQ test, making him brainier than physicist Albert Einstein. Ramarni Wilfred, of Loom Grove, Romford, took the Mensa IQ test at Birbeck University and achieved a score of 162. "I was surprised and very happy when I read the results of my IQ test as I didn't feel very confident - after completing the test," Ramarni was quoted as saying by the 'Romford Recorder'. Ramarni, his mother Anthea and older sister moved to Romford two years ago but it was a lot earlier that Anthea realised there was something a little special about her son. "By the time he was three he could read and write and from 18 months we discussed the news and his favourite book was an encyclopedia!" said Anthea. "Ramarni's score shows he has great potential and we are pleased to welcome him to Mensa. We hope he will enjoy being part of the society and interacting with fellow members," Mensa's chief executive, John Stevenage, said. Although Einstein never took an IQ test as none of the modern intelligence tests existed during the course of his life, experts believe he had an IQ of around 160. (From London's Financial Express for May 14, 2014.)